St. Frederick High School students  qualify for Duke gifted program

Seventh-grade students at St. Frederick High School have been invited to join the prestigious 7th Grade Talent Search for gifted students sponsored by Duke University’s Talent Identification Program, better known as Duke TIP.

Each year a select group of students in the United States are identified as academically gifted based on their exceptional standardized test scores in school and are invited to participate in the TIP program.

Only students scoring in the 95th percentile or better on standardized tests qualify. This year, 30 percent of the seventh-grade class at St. Frederick High School have been identified as gifted.

Participants are invited to take the above-grade level ACT or SAT tests designed for college-bound tenth and eleventh graders so that their academic abilities and potential can be more accurately evaluated. They also receive a variety of support services and gain access to research and other information about using their academic abilities more effectively.

The Duke University Talent Identification Program is a nonprofit educational organization that is recognized as a leader in identifying and serving the educational needs of academically gifted youth.

Through identification, recognition, challenging educational programs, information, advocacy and research, Duke TIP provides resources to gifted students, their parents, educators, and schools to help gifted scholars reach their full academic potential.

St. Frederick’s seventh graders who have been recognized by Duke TIP are: Audrey Barron, Ella Bonner, A. J. Jacola, Cullin McCarthy, Ellie Nagem, Stella Neitz, Kathryn Nunnelee, Maggie Rocconi, Tyson Smith, Anthony Jackson, Matthew Malloy, Mareesa Mellino, Baylee Mobley, Aiden Phelps, Marsala Traha, and Wolf Donald.

Seventh-grade students at St. Frederick High School have been invited to join the prestigious 7th Grade Talent Search for gifted students sponsored by Duke University’s Talent Identification Program, better known as Duke TIP.

Each year a select group of students in the United States are identified as academically gifted based on their exceptional standardized test scores in school and are invited to participate in the TIP program.

Only students scoring in the 95th percentile or better on standardized tests qualify. This year, 30 percent of the seventh-grade class at St. Frederick High School have been identified as gifted.

Participants are invited to take the above-grade level ACT or SAT tests designed for college-bound tenth and eleventh graders so that their academic abilities and potential can be more accurately evaluated. They also receive a variety of support services and gain access to research and other information about using their academic abilities more effectively.

The Duke University Talent Identification Program is a nonprofit educational organization that is recognized as a leader in identifying and serving the educational needs of academically gifted youth.

Through identification, recognition, challenging educational programs, information, advocacy and research, Duke TIP provides resources to gifted students, their parents, educators, and schools to help gifted scholars reach their full academic potential.

St. Frederick’s seventh graders who have been recognized by Duke TIP are: Audrey Barron, Ella Bonner, A. J. Jacola, Cullin McCarthy, Ellie Nagem, Stella Neitz, Kathryn Nunnelee, Maggie Rocconi, Tyson Smith, Anthony Jackson, Matthew Malloy, Mareesa Mellino, Baylee Mobley, Aiden Phelps, Marsala Traha, and Wolf Donald.

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