• The U.S. Census Bureau is sending reminder notice postcards to an estimated 69 million households nationally that have not yet responded to the 2020 Census.

    About 53.4% of households across the country have already responded since invitations began arriving in mailboxes on March 12. Those households that have not yet responded to the census will receive an in person visit by a census taker to collect their information later this summer.

    According to the Census Bureau’s online response map tracking the nation’s participation in the census, almost 79 million households have already responded online, by phone or by mail.

    Why is the census so important?

    The results are used to determine how much funding local communities receive for key public services and how many seats each state gets in Congress. State and local officials also use census counts to draw boundaries for congressional, state legislative, and school districts.

    And while you are required by law to participate, the Census Bureau is also required by law to protect your answers. Your responses are used only to produce statistics. The Census Bureau does not disclose any personal information.

    During the 2020 Census, the Census Bureau will never ask you for:

    Your Social Security number.

    Money or donations.

    Anything on behalf of a political party.

    Your bank or credit card account numbers.

    Additionally, there is no citizenship question on the 2020 Census.

    If someone claiming to be from the Census Bureau contacts you via email or phone and asks you for one of these things, it's a scam, and you should not cooperate.

    What Happens to Your Answers?

    Your personal information is kept confidential. The Census Bureau is bound by federal law to protect your information, and your data is used only for statistical purposes.

    The count is mandated by the Constitution and conducted by the U.S. Census Bureau, a nonpartisan government agency. The 2020 Census counts the population in the United States and five U.S. territories (Puerto Rico, American Samoa, the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands, Guam, and the U.S. Virgin Islands). Each home will receive an invitation to respond to a short questionnaire—online, by phone, or by mail—between March 12-20

    Why We Conduct This Count

    The census provides critical data that lawmakers, business owners, teachers, and many others use to provide daily services, products, and support for you and your community. Every year, billions of dollars in federal funding go to hospitals, fire departments, schools, roads, and other resources based on census data.

    The results of the census also determine the number of seats each state will have in the U.S. House of Representatives, and they are used to draw congressional and state legislative districts.

    It's also in the Constitution: Article 1, Section 2, mandates that the country conduct a count of its population once every 10 years. The 2020 Census will mark the 24th time that the country has counted its population since 1790.

    Counting Everyone

    Participating in the census is required by law, even if you recently completed another survey from the Census Bureau. A complete and accurate count is critical for you and your community, because the results of the 2020 Census will affect community funding, congressional representation, and more.

    Spread the Word

    The 2020 Census is more than a population count. It's an opportunity to shape your community's future. Through your social media channels, your voice can make a difference.

    Did you know:

    Your response is required by law? The count is mandated by the Constitution!

    Results are used to determine how much funding local communities receive?

    Results determine how many seats each state gets in Congress?

    Results are used to draw boundaries for congressional, legislative, and school districts?

    The results determine how much funding local entities receive to provide key services. State and local officials also use census counts to draw boundaries for congressional, state legislative, and school districts.  The census provides critical data that lawmakers, business owners, teachers, and many others use to provide daily services, products, and support for you and your community. Every year, billions of dollars in federal funding go to hospitals, fire departments, schools, roads, and other resources based on census data. If you received a stimulus check – this was based on data collected by the census!

    Federal emergency response programs, such as the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), incorporate census population statistics into operations to ensure efficient evacuation and rescue methods during disasters.

    Infrastructure quality plays an important role in everyday safety. Census statistics have the potential to impact where money to build and improve infrastructure is allocated across the U.S. Explore the condition and performance of infrastructure in your state and whether the infrastructure around you needs updating.

     

    Did you know that your response to the census is required by law and is mandated by the Constitution? So, what if I don’t respond, what will happen?  Simply put, someone from the Census Bureau will follow up in person to collect your response. Furthermore, by not responding, your data is not collected to be used toward benefitting your community.  In essence, by not responding, you have cost your community dollars toward improvements.

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