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The leaders of the Ouachita River Expedition of 1804-05 were no strangers to frontier challenges. Each had previously survived long journeys into the wilderness regions of America and often depended on river travel.

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It seems every time Louisiana holds a major election voters are asked to entertain a slew of proposed amendments to the state Constitution.

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Few tasks were more dangerous during the frontier era than traversing the nation’s rivers on a flatboat. But the challenge was taken because river travel was the fastest way to move the family, livestock and possessions to a new home and life.

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If voter turnout during the first couple of days of early voting is any indication, Gov. John Bel Edwards has a problem on his hands.

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Timing isn’t the only factor worth considering in politics, but if you get it wrong, you’ll discover the misstep sooner rather than later — usually in a very public way, with the missed opportunity and unmissable regret on display for all to see, hear and feel. The difference between victory…

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At the end of the 18th century, the need for a wagon road connecting Natchez to the rest of the country via Nashville, Tenn., approximately 450 miles away became crucial. This issue came to forefront in 1798 after Congress created the Mississippi Territory and made Natchez the capital.

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Every gubernatorial election has a turning point, when things get just weird enough to justify the price of admission. As many of you surely know, that turning point is happening right now.

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The locker room chatter in and around the gubernatorial campaign of Congressman Ralph Abraham can be summed up in five words: “Not Ready for Prime Time.”

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In the 19th century – when the steamboat industry prospered – few men possessed more absolute power or were held in higher esteem than the steamboat pilot.

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Can Ralph Abraham or Eddie Rispone make enough headway over the next month to stop Gov. John Bel Edwards from winning re-election in the Oct. 12 primary?

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Reporters, talking heads, columnists, editors and producers are slowly taking more of an interest in Louisiana’s race for governor, based on a recent analysis from LaPolitics.com of state and national news published between May 30 and Aug. 29, 2019.

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The Pelican Institute recently held a constitutional convention forum in Baton Rouge. A few bigwigs showed up, ranging from mega-donors and politicians to out-of-state academics and lobbyists. The policy issue remains all the rage, even though we’re unlikely to see a gathering on the scale o…

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No matter what kind of politician you might be, regardless of your war chest or name recognition, winning in the first round is the easiest way to go, aside from escaping opposition altogether.

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The two big Republicans running for governor have about two weeks to get their houses in order or Gov. John Bel Edwards is going to run away with the race.

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It’s no big secret that the Louisiana Legislature has been undergoing significant changes over the last few election cycles, and that both the House and Senate have been in a constant state of transition. Few political observers, however, recognize that the transition will conclude with the …

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Supreme Court Justice Jeff Hughes’ handling of a couple of child custody cases when he was a district court judge in Livingston Parish almost 20 years ago prompted The (Baton Rouge) Advocate to take a deep dive into why Hughes’ actions were kept secret from the public.

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“If you go into the Northern States,” exclaimed prosecuting attorney Ben Hardin in a Kentucky courtroom in 1839, “it is a rare thing if you can find a man in ten thousand with a deadly weapon on his person. Go into other states that shall be nameless, and you will hear of them as often as of…

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Lobbyists, candidates, incumbents and consultants have been on pins and needles this week. They’re ready for qualifying to come and go, for the sign-up process for elections brings with it some certainty.

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All credit goes to state Rep. Sam Jones, who probably stole it from someone else before I stole it from him and made it a staple of LaPolitics’ annual election reporting.

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Republican gubernatorial candidate Eddie Rispone has quashed any doubts that he would actually spend a sizable share of the more than $10 million of his own money that he’s already pumped into his campaign for governor.

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Perhaps you’ve read that President Trump is about to toss millions of the poor off food stamps for no other reason than cruelty. You wouldn’t know from this faux horror that the Trump Administration is merely policing a blatant abuse of public resources for the needy.

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Until December 15, 1838, Edward Wilkinson’s life had been bright and promising. He was in Louisville, Kentucky, getting ready to marry the love of his life when an argument over a suit of clothes led to a deadly brawl at the Galt House hotel. The bloody event turned his life upside down.

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It’s getting close to redistricting time for legislators in Louisiana. By federal law, all election districts must be reapportioned every 10 years to reflect the latest census figures. But should legislators, who have a vested interest in how the redistricting lines are drawn, actually do th…

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It’s getting close to redistricting time for legislators in Louisiana. By federal law, all election districts must be reapportioned every 10 years to reflect the latest census figures. But should legislators, who have a vested interest in how the redistricting lines are drawn, actually do th…

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In January 1848, Seargent S. Prentiss – a Maine native, who practiced law in Natchez and Vicksburg before relocating to New Orleans – was challenged to a duel by the grandson of Henry Clay, the revered orator and statesman from Kentucky. Clay served three terms as U.S. Speaker of the House y…

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