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Louisiana lawmakers will return to Baton Rouge next week for a month-long special session to deal with the fallout from Hurricane Laura, a financial problem with the state’s unemployment trust fund and a flap with Gov. John Bel Edwards over his responses to the coronavirus.

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Word out of Baton Rouge last week that Louisiana high schools would set aside the coronavirus craze for a spell and kick off the regular football season Oct. 8 was welcome news, needless to say.

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During the 19th century, multiple steamboat disasters were recorded along the Mighty Mississippi. Steamboat travel was hazardous due to boiler explosions, sawyers, caving banks and many other factors, including when the captains of competing boats decided to have a race.  

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Just a couple of weeks ago, the airwaves and sports pages were filled with the news that the Southeastern Conference would pursue a conference-only, 10-game schedule for the 2020 football season and push the start of the season to Sept. 26. All out of concern for the dreaded coronavirus pandemic.

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This week marks five months since the World Health Organization designated COVID-19 as a pandemic, a watershed moment that deeply transformed how elected officials do their jobs and how the influence sector of our political economy seeks to shape that process.

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To the average disgruntled taxpaying voter, term limits for elected officials sound like a good thing.

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When Louisianans head to the polls in November, voters in only 28 parishes out of Louisiana’s 64 will cast votes for their next district attorney.

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“At this time there stood, near the Woodville road, about two miles southeast of Natchez, a plain country mansion, surrounded by the primeval forest, but its natural beauty was enhanced by art and cultivation. I know not whether it took its name from the prison home of Napoleon, but it was s…

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One would like to think our governor and state attorney general have more important things to do than engage in a tit-for-tat over wearing a mask to thwart the COVID-19 virus.

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The past few months have been bittersweet for business interests in Louisiana, especially when it comes to politics. Put another way, this has been a banner year — and year of hell.

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In early 1807, during a winter so cold that snow and ice covered the ground in Mississippi, former Vice-President Aaron Burr reportedly courted a beautiful young woman named Madeline Price, who lived with her mother atop Half Way Hill, located on Liberty Road between Natchez and Second Creek.

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In a letter to his mother in January 1845, Seargent S. Prentiss, expressed concern about one of his three sisters: “ … were it not for the illness of dear Abby, the past year would be one of pleasant remembrances; but I trust that cause of sorrow will be removed, and her health fully restored.”

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Gen. Troy H. Middleton stood in the breach and stopped the Nazis from capturing Bastogne in one of the bloodiest engagements of World War II. It's known as the Battle of the Bulge. It was the last offensive carried out by the German army, which had hoped to divide Allied Forces in order to n…

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In the early 1800s, Judge Peter Bryan Bruin's journey from the community of Bruinsburg along Bayou Pierre in present day Claiborne County, Miss., to territorial court in the Adams County village of Washington, was a distance of 45 miles, more or less, through hills and hollows.

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The end of the regular session, a conclusion slated for less than two weeks from now, will in no way, shape or form close the door on legislative politics for this calendar year. In fact, there’s more (much more) politics to come, and rather soon.

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Gov. John Bel Edwards confirmed Monday what many of us feared when he turned his back on working people and small business owners and ordered Louisiana to remain on lock down until at least May 15.

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A new lawyer in Natchez, John Quitman kept his father, brothers, sisters and friends apprised of his life with periodic letters, some of which related the heart-breaking news of disease epidemics, particularly yellow fever and cholera.

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Gov. John Bel Edwards all but confirmed Monday that life as we once knew it in Louisiana won't be returning anytime soon.

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Bare majorities of the House of Representatives and Senate gathered at the Capitol in Baton Rouge Tuesday for just one day in order to beat the March 31 deadline to file legislation for state lawmakers to entertain in this year’s regular session. The Legislature had shut down the session in …

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When lawmakers returned to the Capitol Tuesday to reconvene before Ince again temporarily adjourning, Senate President Page Cortez of Lafayette told his colleagues that the regular session had taken on a “fluid nature.” He said fiscal estimates have “become more difficult” and urged senators…

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