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The special election to fill the void created by the tragic death of 5th District Congressman-elect Luke Letlow will generate headlines but it won’t be because the race will be hotly contested.

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In recent years, most Americans refer to The Purge as a television and movie series, that depicts the violence and mayhem which occurs when citizens can commit any crime, including murder, during a 12-hour period once a year. However, the real “Great Purge” truly happened, it was not just Ho…

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Regardless of the outcome of President Donald Trump challenging the validity of the vote in key swing states in the Nov. 3 presidential race, Trump has single-handedly altered American politics forever and because of him the battle lines separating the two major parties are crystal clear.

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Editor’s Note: This column by Sam Hanna Jr. was first published the week of Dec. 30, 2019. It remains relevant since the LSU Board of Supervisors has yet to name a permanent replacement for former LSU President F. King Alexander.

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EDITOR’S NOTE: Sam Hanna Sr.’s Christmas column is reprinted below in his memory. He published the column each year for many years prior to Christmas. Hanna was owner and publisher of the Concordia Sentinel, The Franklin Sun and The Ouachita Citizen when he died in January 2006.

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Luke Letlow’s election Saturday in the 5th District congressional race capped off a rather lackluster year in Louisiana on the election front, but his margin of victory was more than impressive though not necessarily unexpected.

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It may be weeks before we know the final outcome of the 2020 presidential race as President Donald Trump’s team of attorneys challenge the outcome of the election in key swing states in light of allegations of voter fraud and other irregularities.

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Louisiana lawmakers will return to Baton Rouge next week for a month-long special session to deal with the fallout from Hurricane Laura, a financial problem with the state’s unemployment trust fund and a flap with Gov. John Bel Edwards over his responses to the coronavirus.

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Word out of Baton Rouge last week that Louisiana high schools would set aside the coronavirus craze for a spell and kick off the regular football season Oct. 8 was welcome news, needless to say.

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During the 19th century, multiple steamboat disasters were recorded along the Mighty Mississippi. Steamboat travel was hazardous due to boiler explosions, sawyers, caving banks and many other factors, including when the captains of competing boats decided to have a race.  

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Just a couple of weeks ago, the airwaves and sports pages were filled with the news that the Southeastern Conference would pursue a conference-only, 10-game schedule for the 2020 football season and push the start of the season to Sept. 26. All out of concern for the dreaded coronavirus pandemic.

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This week marks five months since the World Health Organization designated COVID-19 as a pandemic, a watershed moment that deeply transformed how elected officials do their jobs and how the influence sector of our political economy seeks to shape that process.

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To the average disgruntled taxpaying voter, term limits for elected officials sound like a good thing.

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When Louisianans head to the polls in November, voters in only 28 parishes out of Louisiana’s 64 will cast votes for their next district attorney.

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“At this time there stood, near the Woodville road, about two miles southeast of Natchez, a plain country mansion, surrounded by the primeval forest, but its natural beauty was enhanced by art and cultivation. I know not whether it took its name from the prison home of Napoleon, but it was s…

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One would like to think our governor and state attorney general have more important things to do than engage in a tit-for-tat over wearing a mask to thwart the COVID-19 virus.

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The past few months have been bittersweet for business interests in Louisiana, especially when it comes to politics. Put another way, this has been a banner year — and year of hell.

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In early 1807, during a winter so cold that snow and ice covered the ground in Mississippi, former Vice-President Aaron Burr reportedly courted a beautiful young woman named Madeline Price, who lived with her mother atop Half Way Hill, located on Liberty Road between Natchez and Second Creek.

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In a letter to his mother in January 1845, Seargent S. Prentiss, expressed concern about one of his three sisters: “ … were it not for the illness of dear Abby, the past year would be one of pleasant remembrances; but I trust that cause of sorrow will be removed, and her health fully restored.”

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