Patricia Weldon, Crowville fifth grader, Jackson Cordill, Crowville eighth grader and Kemper Cloessner, Franklin Parish High School senior, were named parish Students of the Year for the 2019-20 school year.

The trio excelled in a troubled academic atmosphere where a worldwide pandemic shut down schools months early and students had to acclimate to distant learning whether it be through take home or online assignments.

Through all the obstacles the students continued excelling in their studies and continued to be an important part of their community.

Patricia Diane Weldon

Weldon is the Franklin Parish Elementary Student of the Year.

The 11-year-old student has many accomplishments including a 4.0 GPA, Kindness Club and 4-H member. Along with her studies, Weldon gives back to her community through participation in several food drives both locally and in Texas.

Teachers and her principal had positive words for Weldon.

“Patricia is everything anyone would want in a leader,” said Jalexi Heard, Crowville school teacher. “She is always so positive and puts forth her very best effort at anything she does. She is always willing to help any of her peers who need it, and assist her teachers when needed. She is definitely a positive role model in the classroom.”

“Smart, caring, loving, friendly, grateful, thankful, passionate and considerate are just a few of the many qualities that this young lady possesses,” said Kasey King.

“Patricia has had an excellent academic record here at Crowville,” said Sandra King, Crowville school principal. “She has maintained a 4.0 grade point average. She had made the Principal’s List every year since first grade. Patricia had excellent scores on her LEAP test as a third and fourth grader. Patricia is active in school activities participating in

Crowville Food Drive. Patricia has an outstanding character, and she is a leader in her classroom and around school.”

Jackson Talbert Cordill

Cordill is the Franklin Parish Junior High Student of the Year.

Cordill is heavily involved in school, church and athletics. At Crowville, he has made all-A’s his entire academic career.

“School is very important to me,” Cordill said. “My parents have always encouraged and supported me.”

Sports play a large role in his life. Cordill is a soccer player, starting in Winnsboro First Baptist Church Upward Soccer League and graduating to NELSO out of Monroe. While playing Monroe soccer, Cordill volunteers his time as a coach and referee in the Winnsboro Upward Soccer League. He is also a member of the Crowville Bulldog basketball team.

Additionally, Cordill volunteers his time to with church work both locally and globally. He is a member of the Helping Hands ministry where volunteers help do maintenance work for people in the community.

“My church and family participate globally in missions,” Cordill said. “I have been to Brazil twice on missionary trips. I was a part of the vacation Bible school teams both years.”

Cordill calls himself blessed.

“Blessed is definitely a word to describe my life,” Cordill said. “I pray it continues to be that way but know that regardless, God will always be with me.”

Teachers who have worked with Cordill said he has a strong, ethical character.

“Jackson’s work ethic is one that is rare to find in today’s teenagers,” said Brady Cox, teacher and coach at Crowville school. “He never settles for anything than the best he can achieve. “Perhaps the most enduring quality Jackson has in my opinion is his self-discipline and respect toward others. Jackson has a strong sense of right and wrong and follows it.”

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