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The leaders of the Ouachita River Expedition of 1804-05 were no strangers to frontier challenges. Each had previously survived long journeys into the wilderness regions of America and often depended on river travel. 

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State Rep. Jack McFarland may have an almost insurmountable chore awaiting him when the fiscal-only session of the Legislature convenes April 12.

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During the 19th century, the Ouachita River in northeastern Louisiana attracted self-proclaimed royalty – a Marquis and a Baron. Even the former vice-president of the United States had a financial interest in the region. Each gained access to vast acreage and each purported ambitious settlem…

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Roughly two to three years ago, U.S. Sen. Bill Cassidy paid a visit to West Monroe to speak to the Ouachita Parish Women’s Republican Club.

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In 1807, Indian Agent John Sibley, based in Natchitoches on the Red River, wrote the Secretary of War: “A Party of Caddo Indians lately returning from the Panis Nation were robed by a Party of Osages of 74 horses.” 

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In 1700, the French explorer Bienville, traveling west from Natchez, met a Ouachita Indian in present day Tensas Parish. Bienville's traveling party was made up of 22 Canadians, including St. Denis, the founder of Natchitoches, and six Tensas Indians. 

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The special election to fill the void created by the tragic death of 5th District Congressman-elect Luke Letlow will generate headlines but it won’t be because the race will be hotly contested.

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In recent years, most Americans refer to The Purge as a television and movie series, that depicts the violence and mayhem which occurs when citizens can commit any crime, including murder, during a 12-hour period once a year. However, the real “Great Purge” truly happened, it was not just Ho…

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In June 1804, William Dunbar wrote President Thomas Jefferson that the Ouachita River was home to “many curious objects,” including one major “Curiosity” located near the river’s headwaters in the Ouachita Mountains in west central Arkansas. 

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Regardless of the outcome of President Donald Trump challenging the validity of the vote in key swing states in the Nov. 3 presidential race, Trump has single-handedly altered American politics forever and because of him the battle lines separating the two major parties are crystal clear.

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Editor’s Note: This column by Sam Hanna Jr. was first published the week of Dec. 30, 2019. It remains relevant since the LSU Board of Supervisors has yet to name a permanent replacement for former LSU President F. King Alexander.

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All of Louisiana was rattled to its core Tuesday night when word spread like a wildfire that Congressman-elect Luke Letlow of Start had died in a Shreveport hospital of complications from COVID-19.

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EDITOR’S NOTE: Sam Hanna Sr.’s Christmas column is reprinted below in his memory. He published the column each year for many years prior to Christmas. Hanna was owner and publisher of the Concordia Sentinel, The Franklin Sun and The Ouachita Citizen when he died in January 2006.

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Luke Letlow’s election Saturday in the 5th District congressional race capped off a rather lackluster year in Louisiana on the election front, but his margin of victory was more than impressive though not necessarily unexpected.

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It may be weeks before we know the final outcome of the 2020 presidential race as President Donald Trump’s team of attorneys challenge the outcome of the election in key swing states in light of allegations of voter fraud and other irregularities.

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In his epic 19th century novel depicting the social impact of the industrialization of England, “The Tale of Two Cities,” author Charles Dickens penned a profoundly powerful first sentence: “It was the best of times, it was the worst of times.”

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Louisiana lawmakers will return to Baton Rouge next week for a month-long special session to deal with the fallout from Hurricane Laura, a financial problem with the state’s unemployment trust fund and a flap with Gov. John Bel Edwards over his responses to the coronavirus.

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Word out of Baton Rouge last week that Louisiana high schools would set aside the coronavirus craze for a spell and kick off the regular football season Oct. 8 was welcome news, needless to say.

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In November 1796, surveyor Andrew Ellicott’s journey by flatboat to Natchez was halted by ice in the upper Mississippi Valley. Ellicott had been commissioned by President George Washington to mark a new boundary between the newly created Mississippi Territory and Spanish West Florida.  

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Rodney, Miss., is located in northwestern Jefferson County, two miles from the Mississippi River. The river began to change course a year before the end of the Civil War when citizens noticed a large sandbar forming along the bank

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Jim Barnett of Natchez has spent much of his life researching Native American history. He also has authored two books (The Natchez Indians: A History to 1753 andMississippi’s American Indians).  

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Just a couple of weeks ago, the airwaves and sports pages were filled with the news that the Southeastern Conference would pursue a conference-only, 10-game schedule for the 2020 football season and push the start of the season to Sept. 26. All out of concern for the dreaded coronavirus pandemic.

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This week marks five months since the World Health Organization designated COVID-19 as a pandemic, a watershed moment that deeply transformed how elected officials do their jobs and how the influence sector of our political economy seeks to shape that process.

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Before the settlement of Natchez or New Orleans, the first known commercial shipment of goods down the Mississippi River was recorded in 1705. French traders visiting hunting camps in the Wabash River region of Illinois, Indiana and Ohio collected 5,000 bear and 10,000 deer skins for market.  

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To the average disgruntled taxpaying voter, term limits for elected officials sound like a good thing.

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STATE OF LOUISIANA * FIFTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT * FRANKLIN PARISH