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In his epic 19th century novel depicting the social impact of the industrialization of England, “The Tale of Two Cities,” author Charles Dickens penned a profoundly powerful first sentence: “It was the best of times, it was the worst of times.”

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Louisiana lawmakers will return to Baton Rouge next week for a month-long special session to deal with the fallout from Hurricane Laura, a financial problem with the state’s unemployment trust fund and a flap with Gov. John Bel Edwards over his responses to the coronavirus.

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Word out of Baton Rouge last week that Louisiana high schools would set aside the coronavirus craze for a spell and kick off the regular football season Oct. 8 was welcome news, needless to say.

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In November 1796, surveyor Andrew Ellicott’s journey by flatboat to Natchez was halted by ice in the upper Mississippi Valley. Ellicott had been commissioned by President George Washington to mark a new boundary between the newly created Mississippi Territory and Spanish West Florida.  

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Rodney, Miss., is located in northwestern Jefferson County, two miles from the Mississippi River. The river began to change course a year before the end of the Civil War when citizens noticed a large sandbar forming along the bank

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Jim Barnett of Natchez has spent much of his life researching Native American history. He also has authored two books (The Natchez Indians: A History to 1753 andMississippi’s American Indians).  

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Just a couple of weeks ago, the airwaves and sports pages were filled with the news that the Southeastern Conference would pursue a conference-only, 10-game schedule for the 2020 football season and push the start of the season to Sept. 26. All out of concern for the dreaded coronavirus pandemic.

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This week marks five months since the World Health Organization designated COVID-19 as a pandemic, a watershed moment that deeply transformed how elected officials do their jobs and how the influence sector of our political economy seeks to shape that process.

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Before the settlement of Natchez or New Orleans, the first known commercial shipment of goods down the Mississippi River was recorded in 1705. French traders visiting hunting camps in the Wabash River region of Illinois, Indiana and Ohio collected 5,000 bear and 10,000 deer skins for market.  

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To the average disgruntled taxpaying voter, term limits for elected officials sound like a good thing.

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When Louisianans head to the polls in November, voters in only 28 parishes out of Louisiana’s 64 will cast votes for their next district attorney.

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One would like to think our governor and state attorney general have more important things to do than engage in a tit-for-tat over wearing a mask to thwart the COVID-19 virus.

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The past few months have been bittersweet for business interests in Louisiana, especially when it comes to politics. Put another way, this has been a banner year — and year of hell.

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In December 1848, an epidemic of cholera plagued New Orleans where Seargent S. Prentiss had recently moved. Prentiss, too, had fallen victim to the scourge, at one point coming very close to death.

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Gen. Troy H. Middleton stood in the breach and stopped the Nazis from capturing Bastogne in one of the bloodiest engagements of World War II. It's known as the Battle of the Bulge. It was the last offensive carried out by the German army, which had hoped to divide Allied Forces in order to n…

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At noon Thursday, May 11, 1797, Englishman Francis Baily, the 21-year-old son of a London banker, landed in Natchez on a flatboat loaded with flour. His arrival came at a time in Natchez country history when the Spanish flag was flying over Fort Panmure (Rosalie) and the American flag over L…

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The end of the regular session, a conclusion slated for less than two weeks from now, will in no way, shape or form close the door on legislative politics for this calendar year. In fact, there’s more (much more) politics to come, and rather soon.

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Gov. John Bel Edwards confirmed Monday what many of us feared when he turned his back on working people and small business owners and ordered Louisiana to remain on lock down until at least May 15.

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Gov. John Bel Edwards all but confirmed Monday that life as we once knew it in Louisiana won't be returning anytime soon.

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Bare majorities of the House of Representatives and Senate gathered at the Capitol in Baton Rouge Tuesday for just one day in order to beat the March 31 deadline to file legislation for state lawmakers to entertain in this year’s regular session. The Legislature had shut down the session in …

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In the autumn of 1859, Union General William Tecumseh Sherman, the man who would later say -- "You may think that war is all glory, but it is all hell, boys" -- left his family home in Lancaster, Ohio, and journeyed to Baton Rouge after his employment as the first superintendent of what beca…

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When lawmakers returned to the Capitol Tuesday to reconvene before Ince again temporarily adjourning, Senate President Page Cortez of Lafayette told his colleagues that the regular session had taken on a “fluid nature.” He said fiscal estimates have “become more difficult” and urged senators…

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During the Civil War a century and a half ago this Saturday -- July 13, 1863 -- a federal occupation force of 1,200 troops arrived at the Natchez landing on steamboats. The Union commander was 28-year-old Gen. Thomas Edwin Greenfield Ransom.

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As many of us already know from “Schoolhouse Rock!” and hopefully civics courses, bills are important to the legislative process because they have the opportunity to become state law. Then there are resolutions, which largely serve as the throat-clearing vehicles of the Louisiana Legislature.

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While tort reform is expected to dominate the headlines in the regular legislative session that begins next week, it isn’t the only hot topic the Legislature will entertain.

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Much has been made in the mainstream media about the supermajority Republicans hold in the Louisiana Senate and the near supermajority they enjoy in the House — possibly at the cost of having a broader conversation regarding the priorities of their Democratic counterparts.

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Judge Peter Bryan Bruin's journey from Bayou Pierre in present day Claiborne County, Miss., to territorial court in the Adams County village of Washington, was a distance of 40 miles, more or less, through hills and hollows.

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STATE OF LOUISIANA * FIFTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT * FRANKLIN PARISH