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For some time now a movement has been afoot to name the basketball court in the Pete Maravich Assembly Center (PMAC) at LSU after Dale Brown.

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Seargent S. Prentiss would live only 41 years before his death in Natchez in 1850. But during those four decades he excelled at many things – as a lawyer, politician and public speaker. He also made – and lost – a lot of money. 

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“At this time there stood, near the Woodville road, about two miles southeast of Natchez, a plain country mansion, surrounded by the primeval forest, but its natural beauty was enhanced by art and cultivation. I know not whether it took its name from the prison home of Napoleon, but it was s…

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Seargent S. Prentiss, a native of Maine who moved to Natchez at age 19 in 1827, later relocated to Vicksburg, a new town on the Mississippi that experienced rapid growth during the 1820s-30s. 

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We should be used to it by now. The $1-trillion infrastructure bill the U.S. Senate passed Tuesday gave Louisiana the short shrift. There’s no other way to describe it though Louisiana’s senior senator, Bill Cassidy, would have us believe he’s the man of the hour.

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When Edwin Edwards died earlier this week at the age of 93 Louisiana lost a political figure whose triumphs and downfall will never be replicated again.

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"I got on the Sultana at Fort Adams when S. S. Prentiss was aboard on his bridal trip—married that morning at Natchez, and the whole bridal troupe went down to New Orleans,” recalled Dr. A.R. Kilpatrick, a Black River planter in Concordia Parish in a letter years after the event to historian…

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Seargent Smith Prentiss, who arrived in Natchez from Maine at the age of 19 in 1827, was destined to become one of the most popular leaders of Mississippi during his era and one of the most powerful orators in the country’s history. 

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Thirty years ago, then-Gov. Buddy Roemer vetoed legislation aimed at curbing abortions in Louisiana. Lawmakers overrode the veto. Two years later, lawmakers overrode a veto issued by then-Gov. Edwin Edwards that concerned a flap over funding for the state Attorney General’s office.

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In 1828, Seargent Smith Prentiss began a brief stint as a school teacher at Rokeby, the name of a home and plantation along Fairchild’s Creek in southern Jefferson County not far from Church Hill, Mississippi. 

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In a matter of about 24 hours, LSU seemingly made a problem go away when an embattled chancellor was reinstated and then resigned amid a narrative that he was as innocent and pure as the Virgin Mary.

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In last week’s spotlight, I wrote about the upcoming grant workshop that Franklin Parish Economic Development would be hosting on last Friday, June 11. I think that the workshop was a huge success for many reasons, but mostly because of our supportive community and that is what I want to spo…

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The fiscal-only session of the Louisiana Legislature that concluded Thursday won’t be remembered for its bipartisanship or collegial atmosphere.

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The Louisiana Legislature is in the final throes of its fiscal-only session and to date the only substantive matter lawmakers have approved was a $37-billion budget, which is saying something.

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The man who was responsible for laying the groundwork for LSU to become one of the better publicly funded universities in the country died last week in Baton Rouge at the age of 83.

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Few men were as well known among the movers and shakers in the new American government in the Mississippi Territory than an enslaved man named Cesar, who could speak and interpret the languages of the Native Americans, particularly the Choctaw. 

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In south Texas in 1846 during the Mexican-American War, a young Army lieutenant observed mustang herds so large that he didn’t think all of the animals could “have been corralled in the State of Rhode Island, or Delaware, at one time.” 

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Common sense tells us the ongoing legislative session in Baton Rouge should be focused on how the state will spend a $1.6-billion gift from the federal government.

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I have several things to educate you on this week, all revolving on the important subject of our workforce. I want to spotlight things we are doing here locally to develop our workforce. 

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When I first started as the Economic Development Coordinator, I attended a 4-day Basic Economic Development Course through LIDEA (Louisiana Industrial Development Executives Association). This allowed me to see the many diverse areas involved with economic development. 

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As you know by now, my title is “Economic Development Coordinator” for Franklin Parish. As I have been out meeting people and interacting with the community, I have been saying that phrase a lot. Then I started thinking, how many people know what ‘economic development’ means? Maybe you do, a…

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If you thought LSU had the market cornered in covering up a scandal or two, allow me to introduce a host of judges in the Fourth Judicial District Court in Monroe and a special appointed judge from down on the bayou.

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In between horse-trading, secret dealings and fortune seeking, 30-year-old Philip Nolan became romantically involved in Natchez not long before he was killed in a shootout with the Spanish in Texas. 

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The ink had not dried on this writer’s opinion piece last week before news surfaced in Baton Rouge that there’s another scandal brewing at LSU, but this time it’s not a football player or coach or former university president who’s in the hot seat.

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In October 1800, Jose Vidal, civil and military commander of the Spanish Post of Concord at present day Vidalia, forwarded a dispatch to the American governor of the Mississippi Territory across the river in Natchez. 

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You may not realize it but later this month voters in the Fifth District of Louisiana in the U.S. House of Representatives will elect a new congressman, or congresswoman. At the very least, voters in the March 20 special election will decide which two candidates out of a field of 12 will adv…

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In 1803, Dr. John Sibley, a contract Army surgeon employed as an Indian Agent at Natchitoches, Louisiana, wrote about the Native Americans in the Red River Valley in a report that President Thomas Jefferson shared with Congress. 

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